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Many of UNDP's relationships with countries and territories on the ground exceed 60 years. Find details on our successes and ongoing work.

Assessment of Development Results: Turkey

2010

This is the second Assessment of Development Results conducted in Turkey focuses on the period covered since the previous Turkey Assessment of Development Results completed in 2004 and aims to provide forward-looking recommendations to assist the UNDP country office and its partners in the formulation of the next programming cycle.

The evaluation found that UNDP in Turkey contributed to the development of corporate capacities in the country, integration of interna­tional development principles and rise of many sectors to European standards. UNDP was particularly effective in its support at the policy level and played a crucial role sustaining the local government reform through participa­tive approach to local decision making. However, UNDP is criticized for having, at the corporate level, heavy procedures hence advised to align with the country systems. Therefore the country office is advised to link successful projects and soft aid activities with UNDP’s potential strategic positioning in the country; and to make sure its support contributes to development change.

Full Report

2004

This ADR concludes that, like Turkey itself, the UNDP programme is at an important crossroads. In that context, it states that the UNDP has an important role to play in the present and future Turkey, and highlights a number of results produced in the key thematic areas of governance, poverty, gender, environment and crisis response. The Report also suggests, however, that a further focus on these core thematic areas, implemented through a strong combination of international and national expertise, would further enhance the UNDP’s comparative advantages. In terms of strategic issues related to the delivery of the programme, the Report suggests that activities where the UNDP has a purely administrative involvement should be avoided, that there is a need to reduce the potential for “layering” in execution and implementation arrangements between the UNDP and the actual project activities on the ground, and that the UNDP needs to monitor and evaluate the outcomes of its interventions more systematically. At this crossroads, renewal of partnerships for substantive programme collaboration as well as financial contributions is needed, focusing on core thematic areas, and the core partnership with the Turkish Government will be the key entry point for all such endeavours.

Full Report